Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998 PUWER

PUWER 1998
Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998:
Health and safety at work guidance notes

Regulation 9 Training
Key points
Training and instruction are fundamental requirements under the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974 and many other specific regulations. Employers have a duty to provide those they are responsible for with general training on health and safety and, where particular requirements make it necessary, more specific training. Regulation 9 sets out the training requirements to ensure the safe use of work equipment.
The regulation focuses on:
1. Providing training to those who use work equipment;
2. Providing training to employees who manage or supervise the use of work equipment;

Regulation 9 states:
(1) Every employer shall ensure that all persons who use work equipment have received adequate training for purposes of health and safety, including training in the methods which may be adopted when using the work equipment, any risks which such use may entail and precautions to be taken.
(2) Every employer shall ensure that any of his employees who supervises or manages the use of work equipment has received adequate training for purposes of health and safety, including training in the methods which may be adopted when using the work equipment, any risks which such use may entail and precautions to be taken.
The regulation explains the training provision for two distinct groups:
1. anyone using work equipment;
2. anyone supervising or managing the use of work equipment.
Training for anyone using work equipment
This does not just mean employees. It also includes people who are on the premises with the employer’s permission or by invitation, such as:
a. contractors;
b. suppliers;
c. representatives;
d. service engineers;
e. technicians.
If they need to use the employer’s equipment, the employer must consider their safety and take steps to ensure that they are given appropriate training.
The guidance supporting regulation 9 looks at the different categories of employees and singles out several groups for special attention:
n young people – because of their relative immaturity and unfamiliarity with the working environment, they are especially vulnerable; they need training and supervision appropriate to their needs; induction training to establish good working habits is highlighted as being especially important;
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Health and Safety
Executive
n new employees.
The regulation does not lay down exactly what ‘adequate training’ consists of. However, employers must evaluate the training needs necessary to ensure that various levels of competence for safety and statements of competence should be developed. These can help to highlight where training is necessary to achieve competence to the required levels.
Training for anyone supervising or managing the use of work equipment
As with the training outlined earlier, training for those whose job involves managing or supervising the use of work equipment has to be:
n adequate to ensure competence;
n appropriate to the needs of the organisation.
Driver training
This may relate to either part of the regulation, since operators of self-propelled work equipment may not necessarily be employed by the organisation in which they are working.

Adequate training
Statement of competence
Training that is appropriate and sufficient to deliver competence in the safe use of equipment.
A statement based on job requirements giving the capabilities to perform a work role to an acceptable level or standard of performance.

Training for anyone supervising or managing the use of work equipment
As with the training outlined earlier, training for those whose job involves managing or supervising the use of work equipment has to be:
1. Adequate to ensure competence;
2. Appropriate to the needs of the organisation.

By |2019-01-22T12:07:49+00:00March 13th, 2017|Uncategorized|Comments Off on Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998 PUWER

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